Category Archives: Patches

Everything is gonna be all blight

“His very existence was improbable, inexplicable, and altogether bewildering. He was an insoluble problem. It was inconceivable how he had existed, how he had succeeded in getting so far, how he had managed to remain — why he did not instantly disappear.” 
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

All of us will face difficulty in the course of our lives. From birth until death, it is more like a series of crises that drives the rhythm of living and disrupts our existence, shakes and shapes who we are.

Whether or not you believe in the possibility of a greater power, you soon have to admit that most of it is out of our control. What triggers a crisis can be anything; what puts an end to it is often unrelated to the catalyst.

Nevertheless, the way we react to trouble when it occurs can greatly influence the likely outcome. And this pattern is reinforced every time we encounter turbulences.

Two very different coping mechanisms can be used: what you are or who you are.

When we need to go back to what we know, what we feel comfortable with, we revert to our turf, our patch. Retreating to our origins, we seek reassurance  in the familiar and the similar. We renew our sense of belonging to a community and a context that once defined us. We reinforce existing bonds, recreate rituals and signs of recognition. We revisit and insist on the common rules of membership. This coping mechanism might also provoke an over-emphasis on difference, what differentiates us from other groups, tribes, communities, organisations, whether real or fantasised.

An alternative coping mechanism is to strike out as an individual, a node, trawling for a new idea or attribute that might help us overcome a problem or a situation we don’t know how to deal with. We seek the unfamiliar and the singular, acknowledging our inherent insufficiency. We invent new tools or theories. We reach out to the unknown, multiply interactions to build, seek new associations and different forms of partnerships. It might change our very self, impact and transform the core of our identity, making us unrecognisable to the people and the environment we once knew.

How, then, to manage the inevitable tension between the two, between your position in the tribe, the hierarchy, the pre-established order, and you as an individual in all your faults and glory? How to keep on being oneself in this dynamic equilibrium?

That might just be our ultimate challenge.

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Filed under Leadership, Nodes, Patches, renaissance

Home is where you start from

The last few months I spent in Bangkok in 2010 had left a bitter memory.

I still remember the sound of helicopters flying around at night – going where? Sathorn Road abandoned with only a couple of army vehicles, the barb wire on Silom – and then grenades being fired, a rebel general being assassinated,  the amplified rumours of an imminent crackdown on the protesters. And an ending that left me angry and deeply saddened.

I left for Paris for a couple of months and then moved to Australia early 2011.

Now, after two years spent in Melbourne and Sydney, I have returned to live in the city of my choice. Something in the air is different, a renewed sense that the opportunity is here. People are busy. Smiles are different; they do not hide the embarrassment of a struggling people, they show that hope is back for the many.

Political stability has improved and with it, economic growth has returned; last week Bangkokians re-elected their governor, and though he is from the opposition party he was immediately congratulated by the Prime Minister.

The resilience of the Thai people has been tested over the past few years through political instability and environmental disasters. Many things still need to be improved: corruption, layers of administration that are making it difficult for the country to reform itself, the traffic alone, which had always been chaotic and is now completely out of hand.

But if yesterday we feared a civil war, today we see no reason why Thailand cannot face its demons and overcome them successfully.

The ASEAN’s ambitious agenda for 2015 will create a common market of 600 millions individuals. Bangkok, home to almost a third of Thailand’s citizens, is now a regional hub for the economies and societies of Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar that are opening their doors at lightning speed, and could well become the capital of a south-east asian renaissance.

If the last century had profoundly divided and damaged this region with Western colonisation and then the Cold War, this moment in time has all the conditions for South-east Asia to reach its full potential.

It will be the responsibility of a new generation of leaders and change agents to make this transformation succeed and to implement systemic and inclusive policies in this patchwork of economies and cultures, where the correlation between economic growth and social impacts is so strong.

As the West sees its economic engines faltering, South-east Asia is the place where it’s possible to invent new models and maybe finally get rid of the command-and-control paradigm inherited from the industrial era.

Home is where you return. And as we create a new venture that promises to shift our expectations towards work and life, I have chosen to return, and start anew from Bangkok.

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Filed under ASEAN, Leadership, Patches, patchwork, Purpose, renaissance, south-east asia, Thailand

Coming out: can you bring value to an organisation after having left it?

I was 22 when I got my first job with a large multinational company, freshly baked out of the academic oven. What a sense of pride and relief for myself, and my parents, to get a confirmation that I could… fit in.

For 14 years, I created value for my organisation, within the frameworks they had designed for “us” to contribute. Depending on the Business Units and the geographies, these frameworks were more or less enabling or debilitating, but I would always get enough value for myself (financial, intellectual, social, etc.) to choose to remain part of the company.

In those 14 years, I have acquired a unique knowledge of this organisation; its people, its products, its clients, its cultural patterns, etc. Having worked in or with most parts of the structure and most parts of the world, I became a true connector in addition to a descent professional in my field of expertise.

The current employer / employee model is binary. You are either IN or you are OUT, and there is no in-between.

Being IN requires an absolute compliance to a vision, a culture and an operational framework. Once an organisation decides to bring someone in, the formatting mechanisms – called on-boarding process to soften the concept – come into action. As an outcome of this process, you know how much of your potential you are expected to unleash and how much is preferable to keep for yourself. Whether this is an 80/20, 50/50 or 20/80 balance is usually not a consideration for the employer and you can stay in the organisation for as long as you give it exactly what it thinks it need, even if that represents 10% of what you’re capable of.

Getting out of an organisation is a very formal process. When you leave the force, you hand in your badge and your gun – your pass and your laptop in that matter – and you turn your back and walk away.  When you are OUT, you simply do not exist in the corporate equation, no matter wether you are an absolute stranger or you have spent 14 years in the organisation, which makes you more knowledgeable about it than most people that are still “in”.

A few months ago, I made the decision to put an end to my contract and move on. I was not seizing an opportunity. I had not developed resentment, frustrations or anger against them. I had just reached the certainty that I could better unleash my potential and have more fun in a different context, within a different patch.

I still had a lot of respect for my team and some of my peers and I was convinced that I could be at least as valuable to my employer, if not more, from the outside of the organisation than from the inside. I genuinely offered to co-design a model where my contribution to the organisation would take different forms than the traditional “pay for my time” model. It would have been a way for me to help nurture the venture I had created and deeply cared about while minimising the unexpected disruption for the organisation.

Sadly, they declined the offer.

What struck me in this experience was the lack of maturity of the organisation. Their approach to the situation was driven by a primal sense of betrayal. The need to re-create stability as soon as possible within the current system completely hindered their ability to consider an evolution of the system itself to turn a challenge into an opportunity. When a key person is leaving, he or she needs to be replaced. Period!

That inability for organisation to foresee alternative models to employment prevents them from accessing a tremendous amount of talent at their doorstep.

Of course, most companies leverage consultants and temp staff every once in a while but the practice remains limited in scope and in time. The systems and processes are just not designed to embrace other models, but more sadly, the culture and mindsets are hardly prepared to even consider alternatives.

  • What would it mean for an organisation to actively leverage the potential of its employees not only during the time they spend on the payroll but also after, and why not, before?
  • How would we approach resource management if organisations weren’t exclusively inward focused but were broadening their models based on the value drivers of their ecosystem?
  • What if one could be both IN, on certain projects, at certain stages of his / her life, and OUT, to pursue other aspirations elsewhere and multiply activities and perspectives?

These questions are relevant today and hold in themselves a huge potential value for both organisations and individuals. But in the world where the number of freelancers is increasing exponentially and where the corporate career becomes less and less appealing to graduates, how long will it take before inventing those models become vital?

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Filed under Innovation, Networks, Nodes, Patches