Category Archives: Purpose

The Future of Mediocrity

“What are we doing here, that is the question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the answer. Yes, in the immense confusion one thing alone is clear. We are waiting for Godot to come — ” Samuel Beckett

The future is not what it used to be. Thousands of articles are published everyday trying to assess the immeasurable impacts that technology will have on the shape of tomorrow. Hundreds of “vision papers” preparing us for the serial shock awaiting us from which will emerge the Future of Work, Future of Organisations, Future of Democracy and Government, of Health and Education…

Not a day, not a week, passes without new blogs being put online detailing the infinite potential the Digital Revolution might bring to institutions, businesses and individuals – as well as the formidable dangers that they all will face. When it’s not a multitude of foresight studies unfolding how Big Data will inevitably shred our privacy to almost nothing and transcend the very concept of identity and self.

As spectacular as they might be, these repetitive announcements invariably sing the same tune: “forget everything you know, everything will change”.

They strangely sound familiar and remind us of a song from a time before the internet:
que sera, sera
whatever will be, will be
the future’s not ours, to see
que sera, sera
what will be, will be

Surreptitiously, they put in the back of our minds the idea that our imaginations might lag the necessary leap to apprehend the world we will live in.

They condemn us to float in this chaotic now from which we shall not escape, an hyper-present that precludes us from hoping we can have the slightest influence on what will irremediably unfold.

Wrecked by a cambrian explosion of everything, our specie shall survive in this bleary, apathic mood, mostly unconcerned by the fact that in this enterprise we might have our say.

Shall we content ourselves of remaining just witnesses of our future? Shall we declare vain and pathetic our efforts to make sense of what will have an hold on us? Futile and desperate our attempts to uncover what could be next?

After 25 years, let us remind with humility that the most popular topics on the World Wide Web in 2012 were Whitney Houston and Gangnam Style, that Justin Bieber has nearly 40 millions followers on Twitter, and that more than 97% of all emails sent over the net are unwanted.

If we keep forsaking our individual responsibility with little or no protest, there is one thing that we can be certain of: Mediocrity will have a bright Future.

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Filed under Complexity, Innovation, Leadership, Purpose, Uncategorized

Home is where you start from

The last few months I spent in Bangkok in 2010 had left a bitter memory.

I still remember the sound of helicopters flying around at night – going where? Sathorn Road abandoned with only a couple of army vehicles, the barb wire on Silom – and then grenades being fired, a rebel general being assassinated,  the amplified rumours of an imminent crackdown on the protesters. And an ending that left me angry and deeply saddened.

I left for Paris for a couple of months and then moved to Australia early 2011.

Now, after two years spent in Melbourne and Sydney, I have returned to live in the city of my choice. Something in the air is different, a renewed sense that the opportunity is here. People are busy. Smiles are different; they do not hide the embarrassment of a struggling people, they show that hope is back for the many.

Political stability has improved and with it, economic growth has returned; last week Bangkokians re-elected their governor, and though he is from the opposition party he was immediately congratulated by the Prime Minister.

The resilience of the Thai people has been tested over the past few years through political instability and environmental disasters. Many things still need to be improved: corruption, layers of administration that are making it difficult for the country to reform itself, the traffic alone, which had always been chaotic and is now completely out of hand.

But if yesterday we feared a civil war, today we see no reason why Thailand cannot face its demons and overcome them successfully.

The ASEAN’s ambitious agenda for 2015 will create a common market of 600 millions individuals. Bangkok, home to almost a third of Thailand’s citizens, is now a regional hub for the economies and societies of Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar that are opening their doors at lightning speed, and could well become the capital of a south-east asian renaissance.

If the last century had profoundly divided and damaged this region with Western colonisation and then the Cold War, this moment in time has all the conditions for South-east Asia to reach its full potential.

It will be the responsibility of a new generation of leaders and change agents to make this transformation succeed and to implement systemic and inclusive policies in this patchwork of economies and cultures, where the correlation between economic growth and social impacts is so strong.

As the West sees its economic engines faltering, South-east Asia is the place where it’s possible to invent new models and maybe finally get rid of the command-and-control paradigm inherited from the industrial era.

Home is where you return. And as we create a new venture that promises to shift our expectations towards work and life, I have chosen to return, and start anew from Bangkok.

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Filed under ASEAN, Leadership, Patches, patchwork, Purpose, renaissance, south-east asia, Thailand

Going on being in this strange world

“We will live in this world, which for us has all the disquieting strangeness of the desert and of the simulacrum, with all the veracity of living phantoms, of wandering and simulating animals that capital, that the death of capital has made of us—because the desert of cities is equal to the desert of sand—the jungle of signs is equal to that of the forests—the vertigo of simulacra is equal to that of nature—only the vertiginous seduction of a dying system remains, in which work buries work, in which value buries value—leaving a virgin, sacred space without pathways, continuous as Bataille wished it, where only the wind lifts the sand, where only the wind watches over the sand.”
― Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation

The very same tools we had designed to be more effective together have excluded us, humans. Not so long ago, we were led to believe that the more tools we could use, the more control we would have on our lives – the more we could be. Now comes the bitter realisation that we have been trumped by our own creatures: it is rather those tools that have us, consider us as pieces at most.

Never in history have we been provided with so many tools and possibilities to communicate, to express ourselves and reach out to others. But at the same time we discover in our own hands a power we never had before, an insidious and unexpected sense of powerlessness comes to overwhelm us. On-equipped social beings, we are left uncapable to change the course of a world that has acquired, in the meantime, an existence of its own. And, as we see rising in front of us a boiling mass of data, signs and identities that threaten to submerge everything, we find ourselves disarmed, uncertain.

Ashby told us so: “no man knows what to do against the purely new”. If we do not want to drown in this ocean we have engendered, we can only rely on that part within us that refuses to be shared and communicated. When everything will be copied and hacked, it will take an individual to have the courage to remain one, unique and singular. In this endeavour, our last chance might be to reclaim our unutterable individuality in order not to be played anymore – and be able to play together anew.

Though there can’t be any certainty here – every answer will lead to other questions – we have faith that playing will allow us to invent new games with new rules, and that we will let emerge new forms of togetherness to shape a new reality.

So that we can go on being.

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Filed under Complexity, Nodes, Purpose, Systems

What does it take to trust?

‘Trust yourself, then you will know how to live.’

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Lewis Carroll was a powerful and precise storyteller, weaving magic that has disturbed and delighted generations of children.

His dialogue laid bare human foibles, his characters magnified our social charades; with exquisite skill, he crafted a confounding and unsettling hall of mirrors for the meek, the naïve, the well-meaning.

In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the King’s advice to the White Rabbit still resonates: “Begin at the beginning and go on until you come to the end; then stop.”

If only it were that simple.

Today we operate in a vast networked expanse of giant mirrors, a maze beyond our wildest dreams (or nightmares), where ‘the beginning’ is hard to pinpoint and ‘the end’ is opaque or too frightening to contemplate.

In this world, they say, the new currency is trust.

The catch: we’re apparently hardwired not to trust, or to be very careful about whom we trust. A few biological iterations back, misplaced trust could have turned us into some predator’s breakfast.

Socially, we know we must trust each other enough to get things done, to raise children, to wage wars. Someone has to have our back, to pay our bills, to tend us when we’re sick.

In that sense, not much has changed since the caves and prairies. In a complex, volatile environment, with threats coming from all sides, trust helps us get things done.

And yet. Is trusting enough enough?

What drove Leonardo da Vinci to push the boundaries of knowledge, of art, of music? That propelled Marie Cure across the sciences to discover radioactive isotopes? That led Frank Lloyd Wright to build a house across a waterfall?

Whom (or what) did they trust throughout the process of conception and creation, destruction and renewal, exhilaration and despair?

Themselves.

One assumes they didn’t need ‘leaders’ to tell them what to do (just as well, if you follow Edelman’s depressing trust research). They just did it.

Through pitiless self-examination, by pressing hard on the bruises of love and loss, they reached the core. They stripped truth back to Truth and followed its lead, drawn by the barest hint of something magnificent waiting to emerge.

Trust in their vision, their quest, drew others to them but in the end, it was they who owned it and drove it. They understood ‘why’ at its deepest and darkest and with that knowledge were armed to live, to love and achieve.

Begin at the beginning, the King said, and he was right.

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